Exercise

Exercise is an important part in the work that you can do to prevent or delay the onset of Type 2 Diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), individuals need to make sure they are at least 150 minutes of exercise each week, preferably a mix of aerobic and muscle-strengthening activities. 


Aerobic Exercise​ or “cardio” gets you breathing harder and your heart beating faster. From pushing a lawn mower, to taking a dance class, to biking to the store – all types of activities count. As long as you’re doing them at a moderate or vigorous intensity for at least 10 minutes at a time.


Muscle-Strengthening Exercise consists of activities that work all the major muscle groups of your body (legs, hips, back, chest, abdomen, shoulders, and arms). This consists of lifting weights, heavy gardening or tilling, yoga, or resistance band training. 


How to Start Exercising


Begin by slowly introducing exercise into your lifestyle. Try to find exercises that interest you or keep you occupied. Set aside time to exercise by using a calendar or cell phone app, and make sure to record your exercises using a calendar or a cell phone app (such as  the MyFitnessPal app).


Here are some additional Aerobic Exercises that you can introduce to reach the goal of 150 hours per week of exercise:

  • Walking fast
  • Doing water aerobics
  • Riding a bike on level ground or with few hills
  • Playing doubles tennis
  • Pushing a lawn mower
  • Jogging or running
  • Swimming laps
  • Riding a bike fast or on hills
  • Playing singles tennis
  • Playing basketball


For an introductory video to exercising, check out the video below, part of the "Walking Down Your Blood Sugar" video series. 












Overall, work to incorporate exercise into your daily routine, and make sure you find an exercise or exercises that you enjoy. Consider listening to music or a podcast while exercising to help pass the time. Before long, you'll be reaching your goal of 150 minutes per week of exercise!



Healthy eating is key to preventing or delaying the onset of Type 2 Diabetes. Even simple lifestyle changes, like switching from pop to water, can make a huge difference. Click the links below to review easy shopping lists and recipes for a healthy breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snack.
Breakfast
Quick Breakfast Ideas: American Diabetes Association

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas

Best Breakfast Ideas: Diabetes Living


Lunch

Easy Lunch Recipes

Quick Lunch Recipes: American Diabetes Association

Lunch ideas for Patients with Prediabetes


Dinner

Quick Dinner Ideas: American Diabetes Association

6 Ingredient Dinners

​10 Healthy Dinner Ideas


Snacks

​Top 25 Snacks


In addition to the links above, a great resource to find recipes, snack ideas, and information about what to eat if you have prediabtes can be found on Pinterest! Search Pinterest and create your own Pinterest board with healthy meal and snack ideas, and you will be eating healthy in no time!

Healthy Eating and Exercise

Healthy Eating

Source: 

1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Physical Activity.https://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/basics/pa-health/index.htm 2018.